Film about Jewish life in Mukacheve (Munkacs) in 1933 and more


For those of you who haven’t seen it already, you can now see the complete nine-minute film made about Jewish life in ukacheve/Munkacs/Munkatch, which is now in present day Ukraine, but at one time was either part of Hungary, Czechoslovakia or the Soviet Union.

What can you see in this short film?

You can see the wedding of Frime Chaye Rivke Shapira, who was the daughter of Grand Rebbe Eleazer Shapira of Munkacs to Rabbi Rabinowitz in March 1933.

She was mother to the present Munkatcher and Dinover Rebbes.

There are also other scenes from Munkacs, both secular and religious. There is the wedding and the many well wishers who helped celebrate the wedding in the streets of Munkacs. You can listen to the Munkacs Rebbe make a speech in Yiddish, telling all the Jews who were living in the U.S. at the time to keep the Sabbath. You can hear the cantor sing blessings at the wedding under the chupah.

Secondly, you can hear the Jewish children of Munkacs sing together. Thirdly you can see religious Jewish children studying at a religious school in Munkacs. Fourthly, you can see a young student seeking to buy a religious book from a book peddler. Lastly, you can see the joyous celebration of secular Jews dancing in Munkacs.

So this is one way we can travel back in time nearly seventy-seven years ago, albeit for just nine minutes. Even if we never had a relative who once lived in Munkacs, we can probably all appreciate the Jewish culture, the Jewish life that existed in Eastern Europe (and elsewhere) at the time.

The film clip can be found at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/fs-mukacheve-03.htm. The film clip will only be available on my site through March 7th, when hopefully new film clips, as part of the Museum’s Film Series, will be shown. Now, also through March 7th, you can see the “Dance of Death” scene from the Yiddish film “The Dybbuk,” as well as see Al Jolson, replete in cantorial garb, sing “Kol Nidre.” Links to these film clips can be found at the bottom of www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/mfh-films.htm.

Best,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
blog: http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com

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